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easy calzone recipe


while I love Homemade pizzaI’m also a big fan of pizza’s humble cousin, calzone. And while I’m all in favor of this calzone recipe from scratch (and I’ll share a few below), this post is about ways to make easy calzone using different types of store-bought crust or dough mixes.

I honestly think of the calzone as a hot pocket empanada. And that’s not far-fetched, tbh. This easy calzone recipe is as if you took a personal size pizza and folded it in on itself before baking.

Calzone differs from stromboli in two ways. Stromboli is rolled up, like a cinnamon pizza roll, while the calzone has only a top and bottom layer. If a calzone is a pressed sandwich, then a stromboli is a baked burrito.

The second difference is that calzones are usually made with ricotta cheese (or a blend of cheese including ricotta). This adds moisture to the calzone. But, yes, you can make a calzone without ricotta.

Go to recipe

Calzone = dough + sauce + cheese + other fillings (such as pepperoni)

Another key to a great calzone is that you should serve it alongside a dipping sauce — marinara is preferred. Whatever red sauce you use inside the calzone can be served as a dip, so you don’t have to make or buy two different sauces unless you want to.

For an easy calzone recipe, use one of the store-bought options below. But, if you are looking to make a calzone from scratch, here are some pizza dough recipes that could work well:

Other pizza dough recipes can work, but avoid anything too thin or crunchy. This will not bake as well. It’s best to stick with a yeast-containing pizza dough recipe, although there are a few exceptions.

Store-bought calzone options:

  • Frozen dough for loaves of bread – This is my favorite store-bought option. Each loaf makes three calzones, so this whole package you see above will make nine calzones if you use them all at once. You will need to defrost and roll this dough with a rolling pin.
  • Refrigerated Pizza Dough (such as Pillsbury) – I also like this option because it works well and is easy to shape into a number of different calzones, depending on the size.
  • Dry pizza crust mix (such as Jiffy) – Although this will work and is the sturdiest option off the shelf, it can make a thin, dry calzone crust.

This is a frozen pre-rolled bread dough. Whatever dough you use, be sure of it put it up With desired thickness before baking.

If you leave the dough too thick (more than 1/2 inch), it may be kind of doughy on the inside while it’s all baked until it burns on the outside. Adjust the baking time as needed depending on the dough recipe you are using.

Calzone fillings:

  • Sauce – I love red sauce. You won’t need much to get each calzone – just a few spoons at most. But you’ll need some on the side to dip in. You can make calzone with other sauces like Alfredo Or other pasta sauces or barbecue sauce. Any sauce you like on pizza, you might like on a calzone.
  • Cheese – I usually use a mixture of ricotta and shredded mozzarella. Ricotta cheese adds moisture to the inside of the calzone so it doesn’t dry out in the baking. However, if you want to skip the ricotta, the best alternative is fresh mozzarella, which is high in moisture.
  • Toppings – Pizza toppings can become calzones. My family loves pepperoni, and if I have some fresh basil I usually add it too. If you want to use vegetables, you may want to cook them a bit first, such as sautéing sweet peppers, onions, or mushrooms. But this is a personal preference and it just depends on what kind of texture you prefer.

Roll out the dough. At the baking time I recommend here, the dough should be about 8-10 inches in diameter and 1/2 an inch or less thick.

Add a spoonful or two of the sauce and spread more or less evenly toward the edges, leaving a few edges all over.

On half of the calzone add 2-3 tablespoons of crumbled ricotta cheese. Also 2-3 tablespoons of shredded mozzarella cheese. Then add a handful of whatever layer you want.

Fold the dough on itself, to make an empanada (half moon) shape. I like to use a fork to press the edges together, but you can also roll it up. This will depend on your dough.

Optional: Brush surfaces with egg white before baking.

Once baked, serve with dipping sauce. If you want to feel healthy, you might add Salad. I did. Enjoy! -whatever

easy calzone recipe

The easiest way to make homemade calzone

  • 24 ounce frozen bread dough
  • ½ cup red sauce Plus more for dipping
  • cup ricotta cheese
  • cup mozzarella cheese shredded
  • 1 an egg Optional, to wash the eggs
  • Roll out the dough. At the baking time I recommend here, the dough should be about 8-10 inches in diameter and 1/2 an inch or less thick.

  • Add a spoonful or two of the sauce and spread more or less evenly toward the edges, leaving a few edges all over.

  • On half of the calzone add 2-3 tablespoons of crumbled ricotta cheese. Also 2-3 tablespoons of shredded mozzarella cheese.

  • Then add a handful of whatever layer you want, if you’re adding any.

  • Fold the dough on itself, to make an empanada (half moon) shape. I like to use a fork to press the edges together, but you can also roll it up. This will depend on your dough.

  • Optional: Brush surfaces with egg white before baking.

  • Bake at 400°F for 13-15 minutes. The edges should look golden.

  • Served with warm dipping sauce.

See the post for suggestions for a dough-from-scratch recipe as well as store-bought options to try. Different dough may need slightly adjusted baking times, as this may alter the final feed numbers as well.

Calories: 769Calories | Carbohydrates: 109g | protein: 27g | Fat: 21g | Saturated fat: 8g | Unsaturated fats: 1g | Monounsaturated fats: 4g | Unsaturated fats: 0.01g | Cholesterol: 102mg | sodium: 2516mg | Potassium: 97mg | the basic: 4g | sugar: 0.5g | Vitamin A: 491IU | Calcium: 247mg | iron: 1mg

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